Bashkiri

During our trip we will spend much of our time in historical Bashkiria, and we will cross in and out of Bashkortostan, the republic which is the home to most Bashkiri people.

The exact boundaries of old Bashkiria are not established, but it is centered on the southern Urals. Bashkira become part of Russia in the 16th century as Russia began to expand east, and was recognized as a republic after the 1917 Revolution.

The Bashkiri people are mostly Muslim, and were herders. As we travel through Bashkira you will notice Bashkir villages are different and quite colorful, and will come across herds of horses. One of the favorite drinks is horse milk, and if you wish we can try some along the way.

The road we travel along while in eastern Bashkortostan is stunningly beautiful, with the mighty Ural mountains on the west and silver birch groves along the road and expanses of fields to the east. We will cross the Europe-Asia geological border as well as the border of Bashkortostan and Chelyabinsk oblast.

If you like honey and your country allows its import, there will be a chance to buy some and other products at a local Bashkir market. Sweet cream honey is a favorite here, and Bashkiria is known across Russia for its tasty honey.